Supreme Court grapples with animal welfare in a challenge to a California law requiring pork to be humanely raised

Should Californians be able to require higher welfare standards for farm animals that are raised in other states if products from those animals are to be sold in California? The U.S. Supreme Court will confront that question when it hears oral argument in National Pork Producers Council v. Ross on Oct. 11, 2022. Pork producers… Continue reading Supreme Court grapples with animal welfare in a challenge to a California law requiring pork to be humanely raised

The mine leak was bad. The DRC and Angola’s response are no better, report says

In July 2021, an Angolan diamond mine leaked large amounts of polluted water into the Kasai River Basin which stretches across Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo. Twelve people were killed, a further 4,400 fell ill and an estimated 1 million more were affected by the polluted water. Fourteen months later, the DRC government… Continue reading The mine leak was bad. The DRC and Angola’s response are no better, report says

Hurricane Orlene hits Mexico’s Pacific coast before weakening

Boats were brought ashore ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Orlene on Mexico’s Pacific coast. Hurricane Orlene brought strong winds and heavy rains to Mexico’s northwestern Pacific coast on Monday but rapidly weakened as it moved inland, forecasters said. Orlene came ashore as a Category One hurricane—the lowest on a scale of five—packing maximum sustained… Continue reading Hurricane Orlene hits Mexico’s Pacific coast before weakening

Chile’s distant paradise where scientists study climate change

Scientists study moss, lichen and fungi at the Omora Etnobotanical Park in Puerto Williams in order to observe the effects of climate change. Hidden inside pristine forests in Chile’s deep south, known as the end of the world, lie potential early warning signs of climate change. Puerto Williams on Navarino island, which is separated from… Continue reading Chile’s distant paradise where scientists study climate change

changes to waste management could slash emissions

The world’s landfills, like this one in Chennai, India, are a major source of planet-warming emissions. Reforms to the way that societies collect and treat their waste could slash global emissions of planet-heating methane, a new report said Monday, noting that simple measures like composting were a climate solution “staring us in the face”. Governments… Continue reading changes to waste management could slash emissions

Study finds US future floods becoming more frequent, wider spread, less seasonal

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain Summer 2022 has been an unprecedented one with five “1-in-1,000-year” floods experienced across the U.S.: St. Louis and Eastern Kentucky, both in July, and Southeast Illinois, Death Valley and Dallas, all in August. “The intense rainfall combined with conducive land surface conditions, known as impervious surfaces, have caused flash floods and… Continue reading Study finds US future floods becoming more frequent, wider spread, less seasonal

Hurricanes are producing more rain than before, study finds

Hurricane Ian. Credit: NASA Hurricanes have become prolific at producing damaging winds and storm surge. FIU research shows they have also grown to become prolific at making more rain. This dramatic rise in rainfall is reflected in what may be one of the costliest and deadliest in Florida’s recent history. Hurricane Ian made landfall in… Continue reading Hurricanes are producing more rain than before, study finds

Will the Uinta Basin Railway derail U.S. climate change efforts? (commentary)

The Uinta Basin is home to a diverse set of creatures from endangered black-footed ferrets to plants that cannot be found anywhere else in the world, such as the Uinta Basin hookless cactus and Graham’s beardtongue. But the basin also sits atop pockets of crude oil and natural gas, which are being extracted: to transport… Continue reading Will the Uinta Basin Railway derail U.S. climate change efforts? (commentary)

Small eddies play a big role in feeding ocean microbes

This video still of the North Pacific Ocean shows phosphate nutrient concentrations at 500 meters below the ocean surface. The swirls represent small eddies transporting phosphate from the nutrient-rich equator (lighter colors), northward toward the nutrient-depleted subtropics (darker colors). Credit: Jonathan Lauderdale, Oliver Jahn, Christopher Hill, Stephanie Dutkiewicz, and Michael Follows, et al. Subtropical gyres… Continue reading Small eddies play a big role in feeding ocean microbes

What we know—and don’t—about how climate change impacts hurricanes like Ian

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain It’s a question that follows any natural disaster, especially monster hurricanes like Ian: Was this caused by climate change? When asked, scientists like Kevin Reed usually push back. Most researchers agree it’s not valid to point to a single storm and say it was “caused” by the warming world. Too many… Continue reading What we know—and don’t—about how climate change impacts hurricanes like Ian