Examining flooding from all directions during hurricanes

In 2017, Hurricane Harvey drove flooding of inland and coastal areas in and around Houston, Texas, as seen here. Extreme precipitation and a moderate, but long-lasting, storm surge produced a compound flood that inundated large sections of the city. Credit: NOAA Remote Sensing Division When Hurricanes Harvey (2017) and Florence (2018) hit, it was not… Continue reading Examining flooding from all directions during hurricanes

Swapping a Single Food Item per Day Can Make Diets Way More Planet-Friendly

Choosing a turkey burger instead of a beef burger could reduce greenhouse gas emissions and water-use impact. Americans who eat beef could slash their diet’s carbon footprint as much as 48 percent by swapping just one serving per day for a more planet-friendly alternative, according to a new study. If your New Year’s resolution is… Continue reading Swapping a Single Food Item per Day Can Make Diets Way More Planet-Friendly

A New Look at Earth’s Lightning – From a Sensor Installed on the International Space Station

1995 – 2020 A sensor installed on the International Space Station is yielding fresh insights on the global distribution of lightning. Since the dawn of humanity, lightning has been a source of both curiosity and awe. Though dozens of flashes are crackling at any moment somewhere on Earth, these brief electrical discharges—typically lasting less 30 microseconds—remain unusually… Continue reading A New Look at Earth’s Lightning – From a Sensor Installed on the International Space Station

North Pole solar eclipse excited auroras on the other side of the world

Energy and particles from the sun interact with gases in the atmosphere to create stunning light shows called auroras, like this instance of the Southern Lights seen from the International Space Station in 2012. Credit: ESA/NASA–CC BY-SA IGO 3.0 A solar eclipse over the Arctic created changes in auroras in both of Earth’s hemispheres due… Continue reading North Pole solar eclipse excited auroras on the other side of the world

A Single Clothes Dryer Can Discharge Up to 120 Million Airborne Microfibers Annually

By American Chemical Society January 12, 2022 Clothes Dryers Are an Underappreciated Source of Airborne Microfibers No one likes when their favorite clothes develop holes or unravel after many laundry cycles. But what happens to the fragments of fabric and stitching that come off? Although it’s known that washing clothes releases microfibers into wastewater, it’s… Continue reading A Single Clothes Dryer Can Discharge Up to 120 Million Airborne Microfibers Annually

A View of Mount Vesuvius – One of the Most Dangerous Volcanoes on Earth

By Sara E. Pratt, NASA Earth Observatory January 12, 2022 January 2, 2022 Clouds parted for a glimpse of one of the most dangerous volcanoes on Earth. Mount Vesuvius, located 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) southeast of Naples, Italy, is the only active volcano on Europe’s mainland. It is a composite stratovolcano, made up of pyroclastic flows,… Continue reading A View of Mount Vesuvius – One of the Most Dangerous Volcanoes on Earth

Fire Retardant Coating Inspired by Molten Lava

While residential fires have declined over the recent decades, the uncontrollable blazes can still wreak havoc, as the recent fire in a Bronx apartment building demonstrated. Many fire-resistant materials have hit the market, but not all of them have proven effective, and some of them are even harmful to human health. A new study out… Continue reading Fire Retardant Coating Inspired by Molten Lava

Accumulated heat in the upper ocean is at record levels again

The Arctic sea ice extent has decreased in all seasons. Credit: Shaoqing Wang The world’s oceans are hotter than ever before, continuing their record-breaking temperature streak for the sixth straight year. The finding based on the latest data through 2021 comes at the end of the first year of the United Nations’ Decade of Ocean… Continue reading Accumulated heat in the upper ocean is at record levels again

Permafrost researchers analyze the drivers of rapidly changing Arctic coasts

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain Arctic coasts are characterized by sea ice, permafrost and ground ice. This makes them particularly vulnerable to the effects of climate change, which is already accelerating rapid coastal erosion. The increasing warming is affecting coast stability, sediments, carbon storage, and nutrient mobilization. Understanding the correlation of these changes is essential to… Continue reading Permafrost researchers analyze the drivers of rapidly changing Arctic coasts

Scientists reveal evolutions and mechanisms of extreme precipitation along the Yangtze River during summer 2020

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain Record-breaking, persistent, and sometimes heavy precipitation fell throughout the Yangtze River Valley (YRV) during June-July 2020. According to Prof. Tim Li, an Atmospheric Scientist at the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, the summer of 2020 was the wettest in the YRV… Continue reading Scientists reveal evolutions and mechanisms of extreme precipitation along the Yangtze River during summer 2020