Are We Standing on a Quadrillion Tons of Diamonds? [Video]

There might be a quadrillion tons of diamonds 100 miles below Earth’s surface. But the farthest we’ve traveled is 7 miles down, so how could we know that? Video Transcript: There’s apparently a quadrillion tons of diamonds 100 miles below Earth’s surface. But we’ve never been that far down, so how do we know there… Continue reading Are We Standing on a Quadrillion Tons of Diamonds? [Video]

Reconstructing the formation of the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau

Chinese scientists discover important clues regarding climate diversity in Southeast Asia, through analyses of deep seismic reflection profile of Tibetan Plateau. Credit: Earth Science Frontiers Home to some of the highest mountains in the world, including the legendary Mount Everest, the vast Himalayan-Tibetan plateau is often referred to as the “Roof of the World.” With… Continue reading Reconstructing the formation of the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau

Radar remote sensing reveals magnitudes and patterns of large-scale permafrost ground deformation

Seasonal and linear ground deformation on the central Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Credit: Chen Jie Permafrost on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP) undergoes significant thawing and degradation under climate warming. Ground deformation is a key indicator of permafrost degradation, which can be quantified via the advanced multi-temporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) techniques. However, due to the strong… Continue reading Radar remote sensing reveals magnitudes and patterns of large-scale permafrost ground deformation

Iceland’s journey to the centre of the Earth

In northeast Iceland, researchers plan to drill into the heart of the Krafla volcano to create an underground magma observatory. With its large crater lake of turquoise water, plumes of smoke and sulphurous bubbling of mud and gases, the Krafla volcano is one of Iceland’s most awe-inspiring natural wonders. Here, in the country’s northeast, a… Continue reading Iceland’s journey to the centre of the Earth

Turkey’s Cotton Castle – World’s Largest Deposit of Travertine

By Sara E. Pratt, NASA Earth Observatory November 25, 2021 October 9, 2021 The hot springs at Pamukkale, Turkey, have produced the world’s largest deposit of travertine. The hot springs and thermal pools at Pamukkale, Turkey, have been a spiritual, cultural, and recreational destination for thousands of years. In the second century B.C., the ancient… Continue reading Turkey’s Cotton Castle – World’s Largest Deposit of Travertine

Extinction of Ancient Grazers Triggered a Global Rise in Fires

From 50,000 years to 6,000 years ago, many of the world’s largest animals, including such iconic grassland grazers as the woolly mammoth, giant bison, and ancient horses, went extinct. The loss of these grazing species triggered a dramatic increase in fire activity in the world’s grasslands, according to a new Yale-led study to be published… Continue reading Extinction of Ancient Grazers Triggered a Global Rise in Fires

Plymouth, Massachusetts, and Plymouth, England, Share a Historical Connection Even Older Than the First Thanksgiving

By Sara E. Pratt, NASA Earth Observatory November 25, 2021 June 8, 2021 June 18, 2021 This autumn marks the 400th anniversary of a 1621 gathering of members of the Wampanoag Nation and European colonists near Plymouth, Massachusetts. Historians still debate the exact circumstances of the gathering, but the story inspired the modern American tradition of Thanksgiving,… Continue reading Plymouth, Massachusetts, and Plymouth, England, Share a Historical Connection Even Older Than the First Thanksgiving

Climate Change Will Destroy Environments, Create New Ones, and Undermine Efforts To Protect Sea Life

A healthy coral reef in 2012 in the Northern Mariana Islands. A year later, the reef was dead. The reef is a symbol of how climate change is already transforming ocean environments. Credit: Steven Mana‘oakamai Johnson Climate change is altering familiar conditions of the world’s oceans and creating new environments that could undermine efforts to… Continue reading Climate Change Will Destroy Environments, Create New Ones, and Undermine Efforts To Protect Sea Life

Flawed Climate Models? Arctic Ocean Started Getting Warmer Decades Earlier Than We Thought

An international group of researchers reconstructed the recent history of ocean warming at the gateway to the Arctic Ocean in a region called the Fram Strait, between Greenland and Svalbard, and found that the Arctic Ocean has been warming for much longer than earlier records have suggested. Credit: Sara Giansiracusa The Arctic Ocean has been… Continue reading Flawed Climate Models? Arctic Ocean Started Getting Warmer Decades Earlier Than We Thought

Arctic Ocean started getting warmer decades earlier than we thought, study finds

An international group of researchers reconstructed the recent history of ocean warming at the gateway to the Arctic Ocean in a region called the Fram Strait, between Greenland and Svalbard, and found that the Arctic Ocean has been warming for much longer than earlier records have suggested. Credit: Sara Giansiracusa The Arctic Ocean has been… Continue reading Arctic Ocean started getting warmer decades earlier than we thought, study finds