3D fault information improves alert accuracy for earthquake early warning

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Three-dimensional fault models are generally more accurate than two-dimensional line models at sending ground shaking alerts to the correct areas as part of an earthquake early warning system, according to a new study. The benefits of 3D fault models vary depending on the fault style (a strike slip versus a reverse… Continue reading 3D fault information improves alert accuracy for earthquake early warning

Air bubbles sound climate change’s impact on glaciers

Credit: Johnson, Vishnu, and Deane As the world’s temperatures rise, tidewater glaciers are receding and melting, releasing air trapped in the ice. Scientists can listen to the release of the air and potentially use the sounds to help them gauge the impact of climate change on the ice floes. During the 181st Meeting of the… Continue reading Air bubbles sound climate change’s impact on glaciers

A ‘no snow’ California could come sooner than you think

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain It was 55 degrees and sunny Thursday at Sugar Bowl Resort, where the opening day of the 2021 ski season—already delayed because of warm weather—was still listed as “TBD.” “Winter hasn’t quite arrived in Tahoe yet,” officials wrote in a note about the postponement. “The team will be working nightly and… Continue reading A ‘no snow’ California could come sooner than you think

Mount Denali—the highest mountain peak in North America

Photographs of Mount Denali and Muldrow Glacier. Mount Denali (6194 m; 20,310 feet; formerly known as Mount McKinley). Denali Bend key, Mount Denali (6194 m; 20,310 feet; formerly known as Mount McKinley) and the Mount McKinley restraining bend. Photo credit: Jeff A. Benowitz, Wiley Terra Nova, doi: 10.1111/ter.12571 In their recent publication, “Why is Denali… Continue reading Mount Denali—the highest mountain peak in North America

New data will help predict shaking experienced in earthquakes

Wellington, New Zealand. Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain Findings of a new paper published this week will help predict the shaking Wellington can expect to experience in earthquakes and shed light on why the city saw so much damage from the 2016 Kaikoura quake. The paper, by Master of Science student Alistair Stronach and Professor Tim… Continue reading New data will help predict shaking experienced in earthquakes

Environmental scientist suggests lessons can be learned from unexpected eruption of Cumbre Vieja

Cumbre Vieja reactivatesAfter 50 years of quiescence, sporadic and low-magnitude seismicity beneath the volcano started up in 2017. However, a sudden increase in the number of earthquakes occurred only 8 days before the eruption began. Credit: DOI: 10.1126/science.abm9423 Environmental scientist Marc-Antoine Longpré with City University of New York is suggesting in a Perspective piece published… Continue reading Environmental scientist suggests lessons can be learned from unexpected eruption of Cumbre Vieja

NASA Launches Rocket To Investigate Mysterious Area Above the North Pole

North of Norway over the Norwegian and Greenland Seas, a magnetic bubble known as the cusp surrounds Earth and dips inward. Some air in the cusp is unusually dense, and the CREX-2 mission aims to understand why. Credit: Andøya Space Center/Trond Abrahamsen Strange things happen in Earth’s atmosphere at high latitudes. Around local noon, when… Continue reading NASA Launches Rocket To Investigate Mysterious Area Above the North Pole

The Southern Ocean is still swallowing carbon dioxide emissions

The Southern Ocean is still busily absorbing large amounts of the carbon dioxide emitted by humans’ fossil fuel burning, a study based on airborne observations of the gas suggests. The new results counter a 2018 report that had found that the ocean surrounding Antarctica might not be taking up as much of the emissions as… Continue reading The Southern Ocean is still swallowing carbon dioxide emissions

Volcanic Fertilization of the Oceans Drove Severe Mass Extinction – Reshaping the Course of Evolution of Life on Earth

Volcanic deposits both on land and on the seafloor are rapidly weathered, releasing nutrients like phosphorus to the oceans (example shown here is Montserrat, West Indies). Credit: Dr. Tom Gernon/University of Southampton Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that two intense periods of volcanism triggered a period of global cooling and falling oxygen… Continue reading Volcanic Fertilization of the Oceans Drove Severe Mass Extinction – Reshaping the Course of Evolution of Life on Earth

Less snow, more rain in store for the Arctic, study finds

Rain falls in Sarek National Park, in Sweden. Credit: Shutterstock The Arctic is often thought of as a cold, white and snowy region, but this image is rapidly changing. The Arctic is currently warming much faster than the rest of the planet and is experiencing rapid sea ice loss. As a climate scientist and modeler,… Continue reading Less snow, more rain in store for the Arctic, study finds