Researchers find that pumping draws young groundwater to new depths, potentially with contaminants in tow

Modern groundwater (dark blue) slowly seeps into the ground, aging before it gets too deep. But wells (bottom right) suck up water at depth, drawing young groundwater deeper faster. Credit: Nature Communications (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-32954-1 How old is your water? It may seem like a peculiar question at first, but there are real implications to… Continue reading Researchers find that pumping draws young groundwater to new depths, potentially with contaminants in tow

The last 12,000 years show a more complex climate history than previously thought

A Mean sea surface temperature (SST) gradient (defined as g=∥∇SST∥, calculated based on a 0.25° resolution map) and median marine HTM anomalies compared to mean Holocene (dots). B Marine Holocene Thermal Maximum anomalies (bottom axis) and mean modern latitudinal SST gradient for 10° latitudinal bands (blue line, top axis). Box-whisker plots show 0% (bottom whiskers),… Continue reading The last 12,000 years show a more complex climate history than previously thought

Dinosaur-killing asteroid triggered global tsunami that scoured seafloor thousands of miles from impact site

Modeled tsunami sea-surface height perturbation, in meters, four hours after the asteroid impact. This image shows results from the MOM6 model, one of two tsunami-propogation models used in the University of Michigan-led study. Credit: From Range et al. in AGU Advances, 2022. The miles-wide asteroid that struck Earth 66 million years ago wiped out nearly… Continue reading Dinosaur-killing asteroid triggered global tsunami that scoured seafloor thousands of miles from impact site

Satellites capture massive drainage of proglacial lake in remote Patagonia

The lake area (top) and lake level (bottom) dropped precipitously within the span of 4 months in 2020 (Shuntaro Hata, Shin Sugiyama, Kosuke Heki. Communications Earth & Environment. August 26, 2022). Credit: Shuntaro Hata, Shin Sugiyama, Kosuke Heki. Communications Earth & Environment. August 26, 2022 Only satellites were watching when the world’s fourth-largest proglacial lake… Continue reading Satellites capture massive drainage of proglacial lake in remote Patagonia

New research demonstrates connection between climate and Earth’s ability to replenish itself

Cheng Cao working in the PMS Lab at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Credit: University of Ottawa Some 250 million years ago—long before dinosaurs roamed the earth—global warming and acid oceans caused by the rapid volcanic emission of the Siberian Traps led to the Permian-Triassic mass extinction, which resulted in the elimination… Continue reading New research demonstrates connection between climate and Earth’s ability to replenish itself

Study suggests La Niña winters could keep on coming

Sea-surface temperature observations from 1979 to 2020 show that the surface of the Pacific Ocean has cooled off of South America and warmed off of Asia. This regional pattern is opposite to what’s expected long term with global warming. A new study suggests that in the short term, climate change could be favoring La Niñas,… Continue reading Study suggests La Niña winters could keep on coming

Study links changes in length of day with climate prediction

Credit: Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain Scientists have made a key breakthrough in the quest to accurately predict fluctuations in the rotation of the Earth and so the length of the day—potentially opening up new predictions for the effects of climate change. A team of scientists, led by Professor Adam Scaife from the University of Exeter, has… Continue reading Study links changes in length of day with climate prediction

Rainy days on track to double in the Arctic by 2100

Spatial distribution of the standard deviations of the projected rainy days for the period 2091-2100 among CMIP5 models in different months. Credit: Earth’s Future (2022). DOI: 10.1029/2021EF002378 Today, more snow than rain falls in the Arctic, but this is expected to reverse by the end of the century. A new study shows the frequency of… Continue reading Rainy days on track to double in the Arctic by 2100

Internet cable reveals the source of underwater vibrations

Credit: Pixabay/CC0 Public Domain Scientists have harnessed Internet-transmitting fiber-optic cables to overcome a long-standing geophysical challenge: identifying where seismic noise in the ocean originates. Tiny vibrations of Earth called microseisms are ubiquitous, yet researchers have not had a way to pinpoint their sources in the sea. An innovative use of telecommunications equipment has changed that.… Continue reading Internet cable reveals the source of underwater vibrations

How planting trees in some areas could actually increase atmospheric warming

Net equivalent carbon stock change obtainable from the afforestation of suitable nonforested drylands.(A to G) NESC outcomes calculated as the net difference between the carbon sequestration potential (ΔSP) and the emissions equivalent of shortwave forcing (EESF) arising from forestation-induced changes in albedo. Colors represent the NESC effect range, where NESC was calculated in units of… Continue reading How planting trees in some areas could actually increase atmospheric warming