Octopus and Human Brains Share the Same “Jumping Genes”

According to a new study, the neural and cognitive complexity of the octopus could originate from a molecular analogy with the human brain. New research has identified an important molecular analogy that could explain the remarkable intelligence of these fascinating invertebrates. An exceptional organism with an extremely complex brain and cognitive abilities makes the octopus… Continue reading Octopus and Human Brains Share the Same “Jumping Genes”

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World’s biggest bacterium found in Caribbean mangrove swamp

This microscope photo provided by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in June 2022 shows thin strands of Thiomargarita magnifica bacteria cells next to a U.S. dime coin. The species was discovered among the mangroves of Guadeloupe archipelago in the French Caribbean. A team of researchers at the Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI),… Continue reading World’s biggest bacterium found in Caribbean mangrove swamp

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Scientists Discover an Exercise-Induced Anti-Hunger Molecule

We know exercise is good for weight loss, but how does it help us exactly? Stanford Medicine researchers say a newly-discovered “anti-hunger” molecule that curbs appetite after exercise may be at play.  They’re calling this molecule lac-phe, a hybrid of lactate and phenylalanine. Lactate, or lactic acid, is a byproduct of glycogen produced during anaerobic… Continue reading Scientists Discover an Exercise-Induced Anti-Hunger Molecule

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New Perspective on the Link Between Social Media and Unhappiness

The paradox that is social media. Social media gives us constant opportunities to connect with other people yet can leave us feeling lonelier and more depressed than ever. New research suggests that social media may not only make us unhappy through feelings of loneliness but also through disappointment in ourselves for how much time we’ve… Continue reading New Perspective on the Link Between Social Media and Unhappiness

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‘Feeling Younger’ Boosts Rehabilitation Outcomes in Older Patients

How old a person feels is more predictive of their rehabilitation outcome than their chronological age and underlying health conditions. The corresponding study was published in Gerontology.  Fractures, largely due to falls and stroke, often result in loss of functional independence. For the study, researchers tracked 194 patients aged 73 – 84 years old undergoing… Continue reading ‘Feeling Younger’ Boosts Rehabilitation Outcomes in Older Patients

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Detection of SARS-CoV-2 intra-host recombination during superinfection with Alpha and Epsilon variants in New York City

Index case and named contact partner epidemiology In December 2020, researchers and public health officials in the United Kingdom identified a rapidly spreading SARS-CoV-2 variant within England, then designated as PANGO lineage B.1.1.721, now designated as the Alpha variant of concern in the WHO nomenclature. In NYC, a SARS-CoV-2 genome sequence classified as belonging to… Continue reading Detection of SARS-CoV-2 intra-host recombination during superinfection with Alpha and Epsilon variants in New York City

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The first long-read nuclear genome assembly of Oryza australiensis, a wild rice from northern Australia

Stein, J. C. et al. Genomes of 13 domesticated and wild rice relatives highlight genetic conservation, turnover and innovation across the genus Oryza. Nat. Genet. 50, 285–296 (2018). CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar  Brar, D. S. & Khush, G. S. Wild relatives of rice: A valuable genetic resource for genomics and breeding research. In The… Continue reading The first long-read nuclear genome assembly of Oryza australiensis, a wild rice from northern Australia

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Emergent properties as by-products of prebiotic evolution of aminoacylation ribozymes

Pressman, A., Blanco, C. & Chen, I. A. The RNA world as a model system to study the origin of life. Curr. Biol. 25, R953–R963 (2015). CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar  Joyce, G. F. & Szostak, J. W. Protocells and RNA self-replication. Cold Spring Harb. Perspect. Biol. 10, https://doi.org/10.1101/cshperspect.a034801 (2018). Gould, S. J. & Vrba, E.… Continue reading Emergent properties as by-products of prebiotic evolution of aminoacylation ribozymes

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Multi-omics reveals mechanisms of resistance to potato root infection by Spongospora subterranea

Wang, H. et al. Evolutionarily distinct Resistance proteins detect a pathogen effector through its association with different host targets. New Phytol. 232, 1368–1381 (2021). CAS  PubMed  Article  Google Scholar  Kamoun, S. et al. The Top 10 oomycete pathogens in molecular plant pathology. Mol. Plant Pathol. 16, 413–434 (2015). PubMed  Article  Google Scholar  Taylor, R., Pasche,… Continue reading Multi-omics reveals mechanisms of resistance to potato root infection by Spongospora subterranea

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Structural mechanism of protein recognition by the FW domain of autophagy receptor Nbr1

CtNbr1 interacts with CtAms1 via its FW domain We previously showed that S. pombe Nbr1 (SpNbr1) uses its ZZ domains to recognize four NVT pathway cargos: Ams1, Ape4, Ape2, and Lap24,15. To investigate whether this receptor-cargo relationship is conserved in C. thermophilum, we examined whether CtNbr1 interacts with the Ct homologs of NVT cargo proteins… Continue reading Structural mechanism of protein recognition by the FW domain of autophagy receptor Nbr1

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