Archaeologists reconstruct an ancient Aryan bow

Credit: SUSU A unique compound bow from the Bronze Age nearly 2 meters tall was reconstructed from authentic materials by SUSU specialists as part of an international team. This weapon had the greatest accuracy, shooting distance and killing power in its time. Reconstructing objects according to archaeological data is one of the most important fields… Continue reading Archaeologists reconstruct an ancient Aryan bow

How seascapes of the ancient world shaped the genetic structure of European populations

Graphical abstract. Credit: Current Biology (2022). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2022.04.069 Trinity scientists, along with international colleagues, have explored the importance of sea travel in prehistory by examining the genomes of ancient Maltese humans and comparing these with the genomes of this period from across Europe. Previous findings from the archaeological team had suggested that towards the end… Continue reading How seascapes of the ancient world shaped the genetic structure of European populations

Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge

Microscopic egg of capillariid worm from Durrington Walls. Black scale bar represents 20 micrometres. Credit: Evilena Anastasiou/University of Cambridge A new analysis of ancient faeces found at the site of a prehistoric village near Stonehenge has uncovered evidence of the eggs of parasitic worms, suggesting the inhabitants feasted on the internal organs of cattle and… Continue reading Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge

Research confirms eastern Wyoming Paleoindian site as Americas’ oldest mine

This complete Clovis point was recovered from the Powars II site. Credit: Spencer Pelton Archaeological excavations led by Wyoming’s state archaeologist and involving University of Wyoming researchers have confirmed that an ancient mine in eastern Wyoming was used by humans to produce red ocher starting nearly 13,000 years ago. That makes the Powars II site… Continue reading Research confirms eastern Wyoming Paleoindian site as Americas’ oldest mine

Impact of sea level rise on human groups during Mesolithic and Neolithic periods

The protected natural area of the Pego-Oliva marshlands. Credit: Asociacion RUVID A study carried out in the area around the Pego-Oliva Marshland Natural Park, between Valencia and Alicante, reveals how the rise in sea level impacted the human groups that inhabited this area of the Mediterranean coast during the Mesolithic and Neolithic periods. The research… Continue reading Impact of sea level rise on human groups during Mesolithic and Neolithic periods

Climate change reveals unique artifacts in melting ice patches

Exceptionally well-preserved arrows from the Bronze Age have melted out of the Løpesfonna ice patch in Oppdal municipality in central Norway. They have intact lashing and projectiles made from shells. Credit: Åge Hojem, NTNU University Museum One day more than 3,000 years ago, someone lost a shoe at the place we today call Langfonne in… Continue reading Climate change reveals unique artifacts in melting ice patches

New study sheds light on the phenomenon of female Jewish slavery and uncovers gang rape in Livorno’s slave prison

Credit: CC0 Public Domain Historian Prof. Tamar Herzig, Vice Dean for Research at Entin Faculty of Humanities, exposed previously unknown evidence of an organized gang rape of a group of enslaved Jewish girls and women from North Africa in the Italian city of Livorno at the beginning of the 17th century. The rape was organized… Continue reading New study sheds light on the phenomenon of female Jewish slavery and uncovers gang rape in Livorno’s slave prison

Celebrated Mexican archaeologist wins major Spanish award

Archaeologist Eduardo Matos Moctezuma stands over a newly discovered platform at the archaeological site of Templo Mayor in Mexico City, Mexico, Oct. 6, 2011. Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, a celebrated Mexican archaeologist who led the excavation of the Great Aztec Temple in Mexico City, won this year’s Princess of Asturias award in the social sciences category,… Continue reading Celebrated Mexican archaeologist wins major Spanish award

Child’s tooth could offer clues to ancient human relative

Views of the TNH2-1 specimen.. Pictures of TNH2-1 in occlusal (a), inferior (b), mesial (c), distal (d), buccal (e) and lingual (f) views. Credit: Nature Communications (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29923-z A child’s tooth at least 130,000 years old found in a Laos cave could help scientists uncover more information about an early human cousin, a study… Continue reading Child’s tooth could offer clues to ancient human relative

Spectacular ceiling frescoes discovered in the Temple of Khnum at Esna

Two of the 46 vulture figures on the central section of the ceiling (central bay) of Khnum at Esna. At the top, the Upper-Egyptian goddess Nekhbet with the head of a vulture, below, the Lower-Egyptian goddess Wadjet with the head of a cobra. Credit: Ahmed Amin/MoTA In the Temple of Khnum at Esna, Upper Egypt,… Continue reading Spectacular ceiling frescoes discovered in the Temple of Khnum at Esna